Religious decline in United States following Western European pattern

America seems to be following the same trajectory as Western Europe, but forty years later.

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“What do we do now?”, a review of “God on Trial”

Be warned that I do not withhold plot details in my reviews.

God is in the dock in Auschwitz, accused of breaking his covenant with the Jews, in Frank Cottrell Boyce‘s play, a coproduction by Hat Trick Productions and WGBH Boston for BBC Scotland.  God on Trial was broadcast on BBC2 on September 3rd, 2008.  The prosecutor shows no mercy, and the legal arguments are about as sound as Boyce, a Catholic, and two Rabbis who acted as consultants could make them.  I’ve already discussed Boyce’s comments on how this play affected his faith in God in another article.
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When faith kills: part 2, Ava Worthington, Oregon

A manslaughter indictment in Oregon shows that slow progress is being made.

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When faith kills: part 1, Kara Neumann

“It’s like Jonestown in slow motion” -Shawn Francis Peters

Eleven-year-old Madeline Neumann, “Kara” to her parents, was very ill, but her parents, Dale and Leilani, didn’t take her to see a doctor.  In fact, Kara had not seen a doctor since she was three years old.  Dale believed that her illness was a test of faith, and Leilani believed that Kara was under spiritual attack.  So they prayed.  They read the bible and believed it when it said healing comes from God.  Kara died, in her home in Weston, Wisconsin, last Easter Sunday.

Her body was taken to the Emergency Room at St Clare’s hospital in Weston, where Medical Examiner John Larson asked them about funeral arrangements.

We won’t need one,” was the reply. “She will be alive tomorrow.”
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Religiosity appears to correlate negatively with social health

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American voters to churches: “Stay out of politics”

Creationism BoredThe Pew Research Center has a new survey up showing a very marked trend among American voters–and it’s a surprising one.  Since 1996 the proportion of voters favoring involvement by churches in social and political matters has fallen consistently from 54 per cent, and in the past two years that trend has accelerated.  The figure now stands at 45 per cent Meanwhile the proportion of those opposing such involvement has risen from 43 per cent to 52 per cent.  The tables have turned.  Now a narrow majority opposes involvement of religions in politics.  The main shift has been in the opinions of conservative voters.  Four years ago, just 30 per cent of conservative voters opposed involvement of churches in politics.  Now that figure is 50 per cent.

The churches have received their marching orders.

God on trial?

UPDATE: This play has now been broadcast.  If you’re looking for a review, see my other article.  This article was originally posted here on August 19.

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